Find Below Articles Published in
Volume -4 Issue - 3
Month [Year] -- [2014]
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Abstract

Distributed generators are very much beneficial in reducing the losses effectively compared to other methods of loss reduction .In this paper optimal size of DG unit operated at optimal power factor is dealt. DG unit placement using fuzzy logic and sizing of DG at any power factor is calculated using analytical method . Voltage and power loss reduction indices of distribution system nodes are modeled by fuzzy membership functions. Fuzzy inference system containing a set of rules is used to determine the DG unit placement. DG units are placed at buses with the highest suitability index. Simulation results show that optimal DG unit placement and sizing at 0.8 power factor is very efficient. Single DG unit of optimum size operated at 0.8 power factor is sufficient in reducing losses and improving voltage regulation effectively within the specified voltage constraints.

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Abstract

Bacterial antibiotic resistance is an emerging and serious public health concern due to the compromised efficacy of antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of infectious diseases (Cohen, 1992; Neu, 1992; Martı´- nez and Baquero, 2002). embers of the Enterobacteriaceae family of bacteria are medically important as infectious agents, exhibit antibiotic resistance, and are present in large numbers in the animal gut (Paterson, 2002; Rupp and Fey, 2003). Antibiotics are extensively used in human and veterinary medicine, and in agricultural settings, for the treatment of infections, growth enhancement, and prophylaxis in food animals, potentially leading to selection of drug- and multidrug-resistant bacteria (Aarestrup, 1999; Barbosa and Levy, 2000b). In addition, antibiotic-producing microorganisms are found naturally in soil, suggesting intrinsic chromosomal antibiotic resistance originated in the soil in response to inhibitory environments generated by such antibiotic-producing microorganisms (George and Levy, 1983; Randal and Woodward, 2001).